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Spacing of garlic plants in raised garden beds

Spacing of garlic plants in raised garden beds



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Spacing of garlic plants in raised garden beds

I'm looking for the optimal distance (in inches) that I should space garlic plants in a raised bed. Right now I have them spaced 7 inches apart in rows, but because of the tall growth pattern of the plants, I'm wondering if spacing them closer would help them grow faster?

The bed is raised 6 inches, so I guess that's my first and only spacing requirement.

Also, I'm not sure if you can see in the photo, but each garlic plant is covered in a 4 foot wide x 5 foot high plastic tent.

I'm thinking I can make an "area of the bed" for each plant so that I don't have to be as concerned about the plant's height. That is, put a small border around the plant to make sure it isn't hitting the sides of the bed, then leave the plastic just covering the soil.

If I put them in groups of two or three, can I just put a plastic tent around each group? Or would I be better to get them all in one large space and put them in that instead?

Thanks for any insight!

I had not heard of making an area for each plant. But this might be a good way to do it. You may need to make a small trench for the plants and fill it with compost. Also, if you are going to be harvesting garlic in the fall, it's possible that a lot of the greens on the plants will rot away and leave it looking pretty bare by harvest time. I think that, with that in mind, you might want to leave some extra garlic plants around just to fill out the bed.

I've only planted a couple of cloves in each plant (and not all in one day), but I would expect that you wouldn't need to leave a plant on its own.You could pull out a few of the smaller ones and maybe put them in an area where you plan to leave them for another year or two before harvesting. Also, as time passes, they'll probably get bigger as well.

I agree about pulling out a few of the lower ones to encourage the others to grow.

Thanks for the additional info on growing garlic. I was not planning to make plants grow that whole season, so I definitely won't be keeping any extra for next year. But I think I will try putting a few plants into a larger area as well, and see how it goes.

I'm not a huge fan of leaving large batches of food out for all the rodents in my area, so I usually harvest everything right away. I still can't decide if I like to plant my garlic in the ground or in the pots. Do you like planting in the ground?

I have the same problem. We've lost a lot of our green vegetables from rodents eating the tops of them. I don't want to take a chance, so we put them in pots and put thatched plastic over them to keep out the animals.

I just started growing garlic a few months ago. I've been doing nothing more than putting a clove in each cell of a small pot (forgot the exact amount) and watering them. They are very small right now, but they should grow by the end of the season.

I agree with leaving the tops out until you are ready to use them, I have found that if I take them all at once, when I put the garlic back in the ground, it goes very quickly. I have some people that keep them in my small raised bed garden but this is only my third season and i really like them there because it protects the plants from my chickens and dogs. Also I usually just cover the tops with some straw. I hope that some one else has some good info on keeping pests away from your garlic.

My experience is that I have had to weed out plants that didn't seem to be growing the same and then have had to pull out the roots to control pests as well.I don't have the room to dedicate to growing veggies and then have to weed out everything else, so I have taken to using straw (cut on a windy day). Also a good thing to put some small sticks in, and other items to deter birds or the like.

I have used wood chips to try to deter groundhogs from coming through the garden, but so far it hasn't worked as I have only got them on the surface.

Our main problem is with rabbits. They have destroyed a large part of my garden and we've lost a lot of our green vegetables from rodents eating the tops of them. I don't want to take a chance, so we put them in pots and put thatched plastic over them to keep out the animals.

I just started growing garlic a few months ago. I've been doing nothing more than putting a clove in each cell of a small pot (forgot the exact amount) and watering them. They are very small right now, but I've already harvested some of them. I hope they make it. I can see it taking a long time for them to get big enough to actually put in a pan.

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