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The Best Soil for Potted Figs

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images News/Getty ImagesContainer-grown fig trees (Ficus carica) have advantages over those grown in the ground, especially if you garden in a cooler climate. The tree thrives in-ground in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8 through 10. Planted in a lightweight container, you can move your tree around to satisfy the tree& 39;s need for lots of sun and its dislike of cold.
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Miscellaneous

How to Cut Poppy Flowers

Poppy flowers are large red or yellow blossoms that are known for their range in central Europe. This is because once the stem of a poppy is cut, a milky substance oozes to the site of the cut and seals the end, preventing it from drawing water when sitting in a vase. But, with a few household items you can prevent the early wilting of your poppies and enjoy them for several days.
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Miscellaneous

How to Replace the Fuel Bulb on an Echo CS3000 Chain Saw

Like most other small engines, the Echo CS3000 chain saw uses a fuel bulb to prime the carburetor when starting the engine cold. It is necessary to remove the fuel bulb from inside the air filter housing on the Echo CS3000. Replacement fuel bulbs are available through small engine repair shops and some home improvement stores.
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Information

Potted plants: Nidularium, Nidularium bilbergioides or N. citrina, Nidularium fulgens, Nidularium innocentii, Nidularium scheremetiewii

Classification, origin and description Common name: Nidularium. Genus: Nidularium. Family: Bromeliaceae. Etymology: derives from the Latin "nidus", nest, due to the semi-hidden position, where the flowers are born, in the center of the rosette of leaves. : Tropical and subtropical America. Genus description: it includes about twenty species of plants similar to those belonging to the genus Neoregelia (most of the species that belong to it were split from it).
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Signs of Water & Heat Stress in Bald Cypress Trees

Bald cypress trees (Taxodium distichum) are stately, pyramidal trees native to the wetlands of the eastern United States. Changes in the foliage and youngest twigs are the first signs of stress and, if heat continues and water remains scarce, extreme responses by the tree include dropping all leaves and entering dormancy.
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